Choose a Section

Injury Information

Self Poisoning/Overdoses

Useful Links

Sexual Health

General Medical

Eating Disorder First Aid

Common FAQ's

A & E Guide


Live Help

Random Quote

The pain passes, but the beauty remains

Pierre-Auguste Renoir


Sexual Health

The articles on this page are informative articles on the different types of contraception available, basic information on sexual intercourse, and information on sexually transmitted infections/diseases (STI/STDs). Please be aware that most places have laws regulating who may, and may not, engage in sexual intercourse and other sexual acts. The most common of these being sex between a partner under 18 and a partner over 18.

We are providing this information because we understand that it can be very difficult for people to speak with an adult in their life about these topics, or that they may not have a trusted adult to speak to. The RYL First Aid Advisors don’t advocate one type of contraception over another, nor do we encourage or discourage people from participating in sexual activities. We advise people to make their own decisions based on what is best for themselves, and not to let people pressure them into anything they may not be ready for.

The articles may be triggering to some. We have made our best effort to write this article using medical terms, explanations and descriptions. Things may seem presented bluntly because the information is being presented in the most direct form possible to make it easier to understand. We have chosen this rather than using euphemisms so that it is understandable to people from all areas.

Sexual Health Articles
Information on Pregnancy
Print   

Information on Pregnancy

This section contains basic information on how pregnancy occurs, the symptoms of pregnancy, how to find out if you are pregnant, and some general advice if you are pregnant. If you plan on engaging in sexual behavior and do not want to become pregnant it is advisable that you find a type of contraception that works for you and your partner.

How Does Pregnancy Happen?
Pregnancy occurs when sperm from a male fertilizes an egg from a female and the fertilized egg implants itself into the lining of the uterus of the woman. Most commonly this occurs when a man ejaculates inside of a woman during sexual intercourse, however, it is possible to become pregnant if the man does not ejaculate inside the woman, or does not ejaculate at all.

How is it possible to become pregnant even if the man doesn’t ejaculate?

It is possible to become pregnant if the man doesn’t ejaculate inside the woman, or ejaculate at all because the man can still release sperm in his pre-ejaculate that comes out of the penis as a natural lubricant. If a man ejaculates on the area around a woman’s vagina the sperm are strong enough “swimmers” they can actually travel into the vagina and up into the uterus.

What are the symptoms of pregnancy?

For many women the first symptom of pregnancy is a missed period. Other symptoms include nausea, vomiting, intolerance to certain tastes and smells, headaches, minor abdominal pain, tenderness in the breasts, tiredness and mood swings.

What do I do if I think I’m pregnant?

If you think you are pregnant you should take a home pregnancy test or ask your doctor to do a pregnancy test for you. Home pregnancy tests can be very accurate when used properly. Their accuracy increases the more time that has passed since the pregnancy occurred. Pregnancy tests can read a false negative if they are used too soon and the level of pregnancy hormone isn’t high enough for a positive result. If you think you are pregnant and you have a negative home test it is advisable to wait another week and take a second test or go to the doctor for a blood test.

Home pregnancy tests are generally available from chemists, drug stores, pharmacies, and any place that sells feminine hygiene products. They work by detecting the amount of hCG hormone in the woman’s urine, which is a hormone produced during pregnancy. The tests are designed to produce a positive result when a certain level of the hormone is detected. It is very important to make sure that you follow the directions on the test exactly to ensure the highest level of accuracy.

I took a pregnancy test and it was negative, now what?

If you took a pregnancy test and your period comes when it’s due everything is probably ok. If your period still does not come you should take a second test at least a week later or get a blood test from your doctor to confirm whether you are pregnant or not. If you period still does not arrive you should speak with a doctor to make sure that there are no other medical conditions causing your period to be late. It is possible to be pregnant and have negative tests if something isn’t proper with the pregnancy, like the fertilized egg implanted in the wrong place. There are also other medical conditions, and some things like stress and weight changes that can cause your period to be late.

I took a pregnancy test and it was positive, now what?

It is important to make an appointment with your doctor or a family planning clinic as soon as you can regardless of whether or not you plan on continuing the pregnancy. The doctor can order a blood test to confirm the pregnancy and how far along you are, and can also counsel you on the options available to you in your particular area. If you do not plan on continuing the pregnancy the doctor can help you arrange safe termination, and if you do plan on continuing the pregnancy the doctor can get you started with your pre-natal care.

I'm female and I’ve had sex and we didn’t use protection or it failed, what can I do?

There are 2 things women have to worry about if protection was not used, pregnancy and STD/STIs. Pregnancy can be avoided by taking Emergency contraception (please see the section on emergency contraception). Unfortunately, once you have potentially been exposed to an STD there is no way to avoid catching it. The majority of STD/STIs can be detected with blood and urine tests. Some can be detected within a few days, while others may not be detectable for months. Most STD/STIs are easily treatable with minimal lasting effects if detected early. If you believe or know you’ve been exposed to a STD you should be seen by a doctor so they can order the proper tests. You do not always have to see your GP for this, testing is often available at walk in clinics, free clinics, family planning/Planned Parenthood clinics.

I’m male and I’ve had sex and we didn’t use protection or it failed, what can I do?

Unfortunately, once you have potentially been exposed to an STD there is no way to avoid catching it. The majority of STD/STIs can be detected with blood and urine tests. Some can be detected within a few days, while others may not be detectable for months. Most STD/STIs are easily treatable with minimal lasting effects if detected early. If you believe or know you’ve been exposed to a STD you should be seen by a doctor so they can order the proper tests. You do not always have to see your GP for this, testing is often available at walk in clinics, free clinics, family planning/Planned Parenthood clinics.

- 1317 Views

View and Make Comments (0)



Login Panel
Username:
Password:
Remember Me

Not registered?
Register now!

Forgot your password?
Members Online
Online Now: 102
7 Members
95 Guests

Most members ever online was 2910 on September 1, 2016 at 07:12 AM.
Bookmark