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Old 29-10-2014, 06:38 PM   #1
Ballerina123
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treatment for intrusive thoughts

I have a problem with intrusive thoughts and I'm going to ask my cc if there are any treatment they can offer for this.

Does anyone know of what kinds of treatments help to manage intrusive thoughts?



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Old 29-10-2014, 06:43 PM   #2
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In my experience, most patients I've cared for with significant and distressing intrusive thoughts are offered the following; in the short term, a medication such as Olanzapine, in the long-term, a therapy such as DBT.
Definitely go ahead and discuss this with your CC, good luck!



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Old 29-10-2014, 06:54 PM   #3
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I think mindfulness is a pretty good treatment for it, from what I can tell. Which is part of dbt.



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Old 29-10-2014, 07:44 PM   #4
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Thanks guys.
I'm already on olanzapine and clonazapam.
I may ask about dbt. My psych has mentioned it before but he said it would be difficult to get me on the waiting list because in my trust you usually need a full diagnosis of bpd and im only diagnosed with traits of bpd (with schizoaffective disorder being my main diagnosis).

What exactly does dbt entail?
Could I buy a self help book and work through it myself or is it only really doable with a trained therapist?



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Old 29-10-2014, 08:13 PM   #5
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Although I haven't had any therapy specifically for my intrusive thoughts I find the skills I learnt through CBT can be helpful in conjunction with mindfullness and learning to sit with thoughts (not sure where this technically came from although my therapy was "CBT" it was CBT plus other techniques that my therapist thought would be useful.)

If you find any good self help books for this I'd be interested in the titles. Although the above skills do help me I still struggle with my intrusive thoughts.



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Old 29-10-2014, 08:30 PM   #6
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I was on halaperidol and now I take a very minimal does of solian and even though it makes me put on weight I am doing very well. I think medication is the answer cos I tried everything and my life was ruined by them. I couldn't look people in the eye cos I was calling them ugly but that's gone now. I don't expect you to start taking the same meds as me but you obviously need some kind of a change. I didn't know people could hear thoughts or some thoughts and the force of it made me have a breakdown.



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Old 29-10-2014, 09:29 PM   #7
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There are DBT self-help books yes (search on Amazon), but it wouldn't be as effective as the therapy itself, as the therapy is a mix of individual and group, it's very intensive and looks at many techniques and skills that you most likely would need the support of a professional for. You would also be filling in diary cards, practicing skills at home and reporting back to the therapist, also when in need of support outside of therapy they have a rule that you can call the therapist for support at any time. I definitely think a DBT self help book would be good to try in the meantime, but try and push to get on the waiting list for DBT therapy.
Also, if you find the DBT books difficult (they can be quite 'wordy' and hard to follow) then I would recommend a CBT workbook, I've used one in the past from Amazon and found it very easy to use, but you need to be motivated.
Perhaps an increase of Olanzapine would be helpful? Have you discussed medication with the professionals involved in your care?



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Old 29-10-2014, 09:34 PM   #8
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CBT is pretty much the gold standard for this type of issue.

Intrusive thoughts are not the same as psychosis, and so I would be surprised if a psychiatrist used antipsychotics as the first treatment. It would be pretty heavy handed.

DBT is a good therapy for addressing emotion dysregulation, but for intrusive thoughts you'd probably want to isolate the Mindfulness component and practice that. DBT is such a complicated therapy that requires daily practice (and takes 9 months to learn everything) that I would say you'd need to see a DBT trained specialist rather than try to teach yourself. The worry would possibly be that a DBT workbook would be quite heavy and confusing to teach yourself without the aid of a psychologist that you get disillusioned with the therapy or think you are untreatable.



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Old 29-10-2014, 09:45 PM   #9
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I didn't mean to say it was psychosis but as soon as I stopped the haladol the thoughts were gone so maybe it was a side effect of them. I don't hear voices and that but I did have a breakdown in February and it was a long time ago before that that I was unwell. Because I had two breakdowns in nine years i was diagnosed with schizo but I think my symptoms don't match that at all. In regard to intrusive thoughts nothing worked for me and i was meditating for an hour a day and i had myself worked up into a frenzy over people hearing them now I don't care anymore.



It became like a sort of prison. Encased in a silver shell, words so full of bleeding need spilled like drops on dry leaves. And all the while laughter prevailed a long way from here. Nowhere land, nowhere time, nowhere space.

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Old 29-10-2014, 09:48 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sherlock holmes View Post
CBT is pretty much the gold standard for this type of issue.

Intrusive thoughts are not the same as psychosis, and so I would be surprised if a psychiatrist used antipsychotics as the first treatment. It would be pretty heavy handed.
Antipsychotics such as Olanzapine are actually used regularly for non-psychotic intrusive thoughts. My ED patients take them for intrusive anorexic thoughts.



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Old 29-10-2014, 10:56 PM   #11
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Mindfulness has been really helpful for me with my intrusive thoughts and I know your trusts recovery college runs a mindfulness course




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Old 29-10-2014, 11:31 PM   #12
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I have never been psychotic but was started on quetiapine for 'agitated thoughts' by which I think they meant intrusive racing thoughts. I never got CBT though BECAUSE I have a diagnosis of BPD [the CMHT's clinical decision btw].

What's helped me is to talk myself down and remind myself that everyone has thoughts, ugly, repulsive, 'evil' thoughts and that they are normal. The fact that they come in such quantity is not normal but its not harmful; just very unpleasant. But remember thoughts don't mean I am going to follow though on the content of them. I reckon CBT would be the most effective and readily available treatment, so ask for that.



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Old 30-10-2014, 11:59 AM   #13
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Thanks for all the replies.

I looked up dbt and i only think the mindfulness part of the therapy would be of use so it's a bit unfair to push to get on a course of therapy when there are people waiting who could benefit from all the course.

I did consider recovery college but it's on a day that I work so it's impossible to access.

However i did find a guided mindfulness audio book which I may try that way I can just sit with it on the bus or in the bath, ect.

I'm definitely gonna try mindfulness as it sounds like what I need. I did do a 10 week mindfulness course at the edu about 6 years ago but I don't remember much so I need to start practicing again.

I will still bring it up with my cc though incase she has any more advice or knows of other mindfulness courses that are on my day off :)

as for meds; My meds do reduce it but im not really willing to add to what I'm on if there is a practical way (with no side effects ) to get around it.

Thanks again guys



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Old 30-10-2014, 01:50 PM   #14
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the only thing sthat ever helps me with intrusive thought s is listening to music adn making up a story or something to go with the music and if the intrusive thoughts get back in then change the song and start again. works like 9 times out of 10!



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