RYL Forums

RYL Forums (https://www.recoveryourlife.com/forum/index.php)
-   Fun and Distractions (https://www.recoveryourlife.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=22)
-   -   This message should ALWAYS be in top 5 (https://www.recoveryourlife.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1948)

~.Ilyssya.~ 26-04-2009 11:20 PM

To the top! ^^

blondiebear 26-04-2009 11:26 PM

:bath: :bath: :bath: :bath: :bath:

clean and in place!

Olive branch 27-04-2009 12:25 AM

FLY UP!!!!

Maiku Neko-Kun 27-04-2009 03:01 PM

Da-da-da

ButterflyAus 27-04-2009 03:28 PM

Up up uppiddy up!

Schleier von Dunst 27-04-2009 07:46 PM

boing?

Tuesday 28-04-2009 01:38 AM

*Dives down and saves thread*
*Sits thread in lifeboat*
There ya go. Better not sink down to the bottom again!

one lie at a time 28-04-2009 07:56 AM

upupupupup!

OutOfTheWoods11 28-04-2009 05:50 PM

UP AN ATOM!

ksdfjhlksajf 28-04-2009 07:51 PM

*bump*

Schleier von Dunst 28-04-2009 08:35 PM

crash

one lie at a time 28-04-2009 09:00 PM

higher pls

Schleier von Dunst 28-04-2009 09:50 PM

*introduces pogo stick*

ksdfjhlksajf 28-04-2009 10:37 PM

bump.

one lie at a time 28-04-2009 11:48 PM

Bump!

:]

Tuesday 29-04-2009 01:59 AM

The only kind of wave with a definite position is concentrated at one point, and such a wave has an indefinite wavelength. Conversely, the only kind of wave with a definite wavelength is an infinite regular periodic oscillation over all space, which has no definite position. So in quantum mechanics, there are no states that describe a particle with both a definite position and a definite momentum. The more precise the position, the less precise the momentum.

The uncertainty principle can be restated in terms of measurements, which involves collapse of the wavefunction. When the position is measured, the wavefunction collapses to a narrow bump near the measured value, and the momentum wavefunction becomes spread out. The particle's momentum is left uncertain by an amount inversely proportional to the accuracy of the position measurement. The amount of left-over uncertainty can never be reduced below the limit set by the uncertainty principle, no matter what the measurement process.

This means that the uncertainty principle is related to the observer effect, with which it is often conflated. The uncertainty principle sets a lower limit to how small the momentum disturbance in an accurate position experiment can be, and vice versa for momentum experiments.

Lexibug94 30-04-2009 03:35 AM

I have poked this post

lozza 30-04-2009 03:44 AM

*bump*

Ardea 30-04-2009 08:05 AM

*Bump*

:)

sherlock holmes 30-04-2009 05:31 PM

buuuuuuuump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:25 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.